Wanderer - November 2015

Commodore's Report

Jacqui receives the fleet on the Opening Day Sail Past on Buttercup, a boat with a long relationship with the GLYC   (photo by Danuta Sowa)
Jacqui receives the fleet on the Opening
Day Sail Past on Buttercup, a boat with a
long relationship with the GLYC (photo
by Danuta Sowa)

The saying "no one can do everything, but everyone can do something" is a prime example of our committee and the unique abilities and energy that they bring to our club every day of the week.

As commodore I get to see the work that is done by all our portfolios, with this last month being an amazing one. James has got the sailing under way with our club racing and a state sports boat regatta. Wendy has been organizing Hall bookings and Tuesday nights which I hear are both getting busier and busier. Jim has hit the ground running in organizing the storage. Christie has kept our publicity going. Dave Bacon has been sprucing up the club with one of our newer members, Terry, who has been painting, fixing and sorting; Andrew and Sharna have Discover sailing and Sailability rolling with excitement and kids running everywhere. Brian has organized all our rescue boats and had them ready to be on the water each week. Tim has organised all our IT, keeping our results program and web site in order. Though the energy and work that Russ and Jen put in as secretary and treasurer is not seen by most of our members, I can say their roles are very busy keeping the money and paperwork in order.

All of these busy people have and are working to keep our club moving and making sure it is here in years to come.

There is one question I would like to ask each of you "What can you do to help our club?" Could you see yourself as operating a rescue boat, or could you see yourself as Secretary. When I asked some of the juniors recently what they would like to do in the club one day I was told quite quickly "One day I want to be Commodore". I was both surprised and impressed that the next generation are ready to take on the challenges of these roles.

All these roles have a starting point: just to be Commodore you need to have an understanding of the way the club works and preferably be rear commodore then vice. This process allows you to be in a position to make decisions with the understandings that you have gained through the three years leading up to the position. Even to be secretary you would need to have an understanding of the club's executive and understudy the current secretary. The responsibility that you are given when you serve on the committee is one that is rewarding; it is something I can say I have been happy to do for the past 13 years.

What's your next step??

Jacqui

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 1:04pm by David Parish

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In this issue:

Sailing Calendar

The Commodore is surrounded in the Opening Day sail past or is Buttercup part of the compass points?
The Commodore is surrounded in the Opening
Day sail past or is Buttercup part of the
compass points?

November
01 Sunday, 1000 hrs ASBA State Titles
01 Sunday, 1400 hrs Divisional Heats 3 and 4
03 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing - Melbourne Cup
08 Sunday, 0900 hrs Sail Training
08 Sunday, 1400 hrs LBB Personal Handicap
10 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing
14 Saturday, 1200-1400 hrs Ossie Mac FF Training
15 Sunday, 0900 hrs Sail Training
15 Sunday, 1400 hrs LB Crawford and Ossie Mac FF
17 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing
22 Sunday, 0900 hrs Sail Training
22 Sunday, 1400 hrs Divisional Heats 5 and 6
24 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing
29 Sunday, 0900 hrs Sail Training
29 Sunday, 1400 hrs LBB Personal handicap

December
01 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing
05 Saturday, 1000 hrs Cruise to Nicholson
06 Sunday, 900 hrs Sail Training
06 Sunday, 1400 hrs Return from Nicholson
06 Sunday, 1400 hrs C G Drummond
08 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing
13 Sunday, 900 hrs Sail Training
13 Sunday, 1400 hrs Divisional heats 7 & 8

A gaggle of sails in the arvo after Discover Sailing
A gaggle of sails in the arvo after
Discover Sailing

15 Tuesday, 1700 hrs Twilight Sailing, Xmas breakup
20 Sunday, 900 hrs Sail Training
20 Sunday, 1000 hrs Loch Sport and Return
27 Sunday, 1000 hrs Impulse National Championships through to Sat., 02 January

James

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 1:06pm by James Frecheville


Social/Sailing Calendar

No Worries sailed by Paul Borg paints a pretty and winning picture in the Twilight of  23 Oct.
No Worries sailed by Paul Borg paints a
pretty and winning picture in the Twilight
of 23 Oct.

Fridays
Club night up in the bar. Come and enjoy the company. Bring in a meal if you'd like. There are meat barbie packs available to be ordered from the bar. As there is green fleet training on Friday evening, it's great for families to light up the fire and have a meal on the deck. It's a very lively night. You might even win the members' draw but only if you are financial!

65+ Water Safety Program
A 3 1/2 hour course beginning on Monday, 30 November, with your choice of session time. (See article in this Wanderer for times, etc.) Designed to familiarize participants with dealing with water safety on the lakes and CPR awareness in preparation for sailing or just being around the water. The Averys thought it was a must take course. Many new things to learn. Come check out the lifelike dummy.

Cruise to Nicholson
Our first cruise this sailing season is to Nicholson on Saturday, 05 December. Last year we had close to 60 people at the Nicholson Bistro for dinner with many who couldn't sail over driving up just for the meal. This cruise is an opportunity to be close to other members as we raft up together and bed down for the night. Sunday is the CG Drummond race so you can just sail right to the start line from Nicholson....

Impulse National Championships
Why not give some of your time to helping out at the Impulse Titles? They'll be running from 27 December to the 2nd of January. It's always rewarding and usually fun to be part of the team. Let James know if you can help.

New Year's Eve celebrations
We're planning on another shared evening meal with everyone bringing salads, barbie stuff or desserts before the fireworks and on into 2016. The food always balances out nicely and everyone has a memorable time as we say goodbye to 2015 and hello to the new year.

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:49pm by Christie Arras

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Rear Commodore Report

Mara with Drew Mynard plows through the weather in the Twilight Sail.  Some exciting blows out there on Tuesdays!
Mara with Drew Mynard plows through the
weather in the Twilight Sail. Some
exciting blows out there on Tuesdays!

Thank you to all sailors who have managed to get their Entry and Safety Declarations lodged. The process is supposedly seamless and the only problems encountered have been when people have lost the email with the link to the entry form. Don't stress. You can find it in Wanderer or go the Enter Search toolbar on the Club website homepage. Easy peasy and job is done. Or you can do it on the Club computer anytime.

Personal (Performance) handicapping is very much a work in progress and we are exploring means to back calculate handicaps so as to not disadvantage anyone who has already sailed a trophy or LB&B race. The aim is to have everyone start their season on YS (CBH) and handicaps to be adjusted reflecting performance. The top rated boats will always be at or near YS and the rest will be eased back. It seems that some sailors understand a YS better than the CBH number effected with the 80.25 conversion factor. And some just don't care. Tim Shepperd has been open to suggestions and has trialled this non YV and non Standard system. It will be a work in progress and after this Sunday's LB&B race I believe we will have some meaningful results.

We have not yet been blown out but we have enjoyed some good sailing and some upper end weather both on Sundays and in our Twilight Series. It is all part of sailing and no one learns to handle their boat in 20 knots of breeze by sitting on the beach. It is, of course, your call whether you go out on the water, whether you race or continue to race when things get a bit lumpy. YV limits for most boats is 22 knots and that is just one factor when considering whether to hold or continue a race. Other issues can be resources on water and the experience and expertise of both sailors and those who help out with race management. There have been and will be times when the Race Officer has to make a call. And that may be to tell someone to go home.

Father and son, Russel and Charlie Broomhall, find the wind a bit of a joke in the breathless Commodore's trophy race
Father and son, Russel and Charlie
Broomhall, find the wind a bit of a joke
in the breathless Commodore's trophy race


It was a small but competitive fleet of six sports boats who contested the 2015 Victorian Championships over a six race series last weekend. Challenging conditions for both sailors and race management made for an interesting regatta. That ASBA are talking about an Australian Championship Regatta on the Gippsland Lakes means that they enjoyed what we offered. Thanks to all who stepped up and helped out around the Club and on the water.

See you on the Start Line.
James

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:59pm by James Frecheville


Division 2

Kalimna sails toward the ominous weather in the background.  The fleet just made it home on Sunday before the heavens opened up.
Kalimna sails toward the ominous weather
in the background. The fleet just made it
home on Sunday before the heavens opened
up.

Another opening day, all gathered to hear Tim Bull address the members, massive lunch. Then out on to the water to sail past our Commodore located on "Buttercup".

The fleet then regrouped to take part in the heats of the Commodore's and Vice Commodore's trophy races. Light winds were the order of the day on Saturday with the stern chaser having to be abandoned. The trapezium course on Sunday taken out by Gary Maskiell; the first division two boat being Scorpio at twelfth place from seventeen starters.

Divisional series races were held on Oct 18 and Nov 1st in good conditions with Peter Morrison taking the podium on the 18th and Chris Avery on the 1st Nov.

On the 25th of October the first LB and B series race was held. The first Div 2 boat home was Kalimna in 4th place (who says personals don't work!!!).

From a Divisional point of view, we could do with a few more participants on a Sunday; when one looks at the number of boats out on Tuesday nights the potential is there.

In an attempt to boost the true Trailable numbers, the Club agreed to accept a Trophy (The Trailable Cup) to be awarded to the overall best score in the Divisional series/LB and B series on Yardstick.

Well folks, that's it from me, looks like my Ferry's coming,

Chris

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:53pm by Christie Arras


65+ Water Awareness Program plus CPR is Back!

Members invited to participate- brush up on CPR as well

Somewhere behind that spinnaker is a boat, Kiss, in the Australian Sports Boat Victorian Championships
Somewhere behind that spinnaker is a boat,
Kiss, in the Australian Sports Boat
Victorian Championships

Said Seasoned sailors Chris and Lesley Avery said after taking the course in October, "We picked up so many water safety tips and very valuable information as well as refreshing ourselves on CPR from the course. We would highly recommend everyone's taking it!"

Gippsland Lakes covers an area of 354 square kilometres across the region. It's easily accessible and the waters off the foreshore of McMillan Straits and Lake Victoria, in particular, provide a safe and idyllic recreational playground. At GLYC we are very mindful of the need for all East Gippslanders, be they yacht club members, weekend boaters or just admirers of our lakes, to have an understanding and respect of the waterways that surround us. As such, GLYC in conjunction with Yachting Victoria are pleased to offer a 65+ water awareness program as part of our 2015/16 Discover Sailing Program. This course will consist of both on-water practical and off water theory components.

The aim of this program is to educate people in the 65+ age group, on water safety and on being prepared to go boating. In addition to these on and off water components, each session will also provide participants with an awareness of CPR.

Further program details:

Dates: Monday, 30 November. More on Tuesday if number of participants require it.
Session start times each day: 8.30am - 12noon, 11.15 - 2.45pm, 2pm - 5.30pm. You can choose your session time and the day that's convenient for you.

Cost: $10 per participant
Participants per session: 12 max.
Please contact our Discover Sailing Co-ordinator, Sharna Baskett via discoversailing@sailglyc.com to register your interest in this program.

There are still places available...Think of it as a way to refresh your CPR skills as well as picking up valuable tips for water safety.

(Perhaps you can even fudge your age a bit if you're not quite 65.)

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 1:16pm by Christie Arras

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Divisional racing on the first of Nov

Definitely a frisky wind out on the course on Sunday.  But look at Taj with his Minnow in total control.
Definitely a frisky wind out on the course
on Sunday. But look at Taj with his
Minnow in total control.

While having fickle but manageable wind for the sports boats on Saturday and Sunday, things hotted up in Sunday's afternoon sailing for the divisional races. The wind direction stayed fairly constant, however the speed kept increasing.

That really challenged our junior fleet which is learning to sail in the big fleet races. It was a bit of an adrenaline rush for the rescue boats speeding first to one and then another capsize to make sure all heads were accounted for. The Laser spent most of the afternoon upside-down with the young crew being moved to the start boat. A Sabre never made the start line and was towed home.

The courses were laid with a triangle for divisions one and three and an extended windward mark at a mile for the division two boats that had one long course.

The Flying Fifteens in div one found their races a breeze as did the trailer sailors and keel boats in div 2. Nitro, a Formula 15 sailing in div one, is pretty fast but a bit unstable, so Mark Jefferis had plenty of time righting his boat.

Then in the dinghy division three, Tim Heaney in a Sabre and young Taj Duff in his Minnow braved the stiffening wind with no mishaps. It was the first time ever to their amazement that the Foleys on their Spitfire went for a swim. They plan on adding a granny rope to Joe Blow.l

Melanie gets a tow away from the very serious weather front in Sunday's divisional racing
Melanie gets a tow away from the very
serious weather front in Sunday's
divisional racing


Melody Jefferis in her Optimist, Hammerhead, was doing fine till she broached and filled up with water. The Optimist was unforgiving and it took Melody all she had to bail faster than the waves which kept refilling the boat. In the end she won her battle but was towed home to get her in before the menacing storm got any closer.

And just as the last dinghy was being towed home, the ferocious storm hit with pelting rain and crashing wind. Boats were quickly packed up and put away, showers warmed up the swimmers, and everyone enjoyed the joy of a very exciting day safely up in the club house.

In the Divisional club races, Brian Carroll on Supertoy Plays On, a FlyingFifteen, took first in division one; The Averys on Kalimna, a Timpenny 770SK, won first in div two, while Tim Heaney in div 3 on Weapon of Choice, a Sabre, won first. And Taj Duff, aged 12, in his Minnow, Wild Weasel, simply won the respect of so many seasoned sailors for his excellent race and staying power.

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 1:12pm by Christie Arras


Discover Sailing Day

Charlie gets help launching his boat from two very little aspiring sailors
Charlie gets help launching his boat from
two very little aspiring sailors

Gippsland Lakes Yacht Club was abuzz with visitors coming to try out sailing last Sunday for Discover Sailing Day. There was a great turnout of young and old and everyone who wanted a sail got to go out on the water. Mother nature kindly got in the act by providing gentle winds and a spectacular blue-sky sunny day.

GLYC's experienced junior sailors took little and big people alike out on the club Pacers or on their own dinghies. You could tell the visitors, some trying sailing for their very first time, by their big yellow lifejackets in which they were outfitted.

Club juniors Charlie Broomhall, Taj Duff , Melody Jefferis, Oskar Watkinson and Jaime Zizman were busy with their charges as well as Sailing Captain James Frecheville and new members Aaron and Archer Manuell. A number of other junior sailors including, Luka Blackmore, Jack Chapman and Spencer Zizman also had their solo sailing skills on display in the bay.

While the little dinghies criss-crossed the bay, other members took out visitors in their larger yachts for quiet sails initially and then slightly fresher sails as the wind came in a bit. Commodore Jacqui with Stuart Loft took Five O'clock Somewhere, an Etchells, out as did Johnno Johnson on Ghost, a Dragon.

Alex Stroud made several trips on his yacht Mad Hatter with adult participants. One couple, Liz and Alan Butterworth, have recently moved in retirement to Paynesville from the Red Centre where they had tended to camels and now are looking to learn to sail their new Baronness on the lakes. Variety is the spice of life.
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Taj takes a boatfull of Discover Sailing Day guests out for a sail
Taj takes a boatfull of Discover Sailing
Day guests out for a sail


Kay and Alan Pick took out Pandemonium for a couple of not-so-pandemonious trips. And Capricorn, a 38 foot Swanson sailed by Laurel and Dick Warhurst, took out a boatload of guests. Wrapping up the volunteer boats was Nigel Emerson who gave Marcus White, from Newlands Arm who is just beginning to discover sailing himself, a long trip out into Lake Victoria and Duck Arm and almost joined in with the club fleet's afternoon race start for the Life Buoy and Bell series.

There was a sausage sizzle around lunch time for the visitors and volunteers to wrap up the successful day.

Lyn Wallace, GLYC's Discover Sailing Principal, commented how the morning was a great success, "We had 52 registrations, with over 100 people down at the club finding all about our Discover Sailing programs. Discover Sailing Day is such a great way for our members to showcase what the club has to offer the whole community'. Sharna Baskett GLYC's Discover Sailing Coordinator added, "With such participant enthusiasm on the weekend, we're looking forward to welcoming everyone back throughout the season".

There were many inquiries about learning to sail opportunities at the club which include sail training for kids, adult training, powerboat handling and the Yachting Victoria Mobile Tackers school holiday program which is coming back after Christmas and again at Easter.

So we did it again, folks. With all the help by our juniors and members, we had a fantastic response and a lot of interest in our club and sailing. Thank you to all of you.

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:02pm by Christie Arras

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Australian Sports Boat Association's Victorian Championships

Here at GLYC last weekend

A beautiful start for the sports boats at the ASBA Victorian championships at GLYC
A beautiful start for the sports boats at
the ASBA Victorian championships at GLYC

The speed machines fuelled by wind were out on Lake Victoria last weekend with six competing boats in the Australian Sport Boat Association's Victorian Championship held at the Gippsland Lakes Yacht Club. Boats came from New South Wales, Melbourne and the Gippsland Lakes.

Four races were sailed on Saturday with windward/leeward courses using a gate for the bottom mark and each race had two laps and downwind finishes. It sounded like easy work for race management but the wind had other things in mind. Virtually with every lap the wind direction changed requiring the top mark and one of the gates to be re-positioned...over and over again. There were wind shifts throughout the afternoon of over 180 degrees. In fact, for the very last race, the entire course was moved eastward to allow the .8 mile course to fit in safe water.

The competitors were very pleased with their courses and amazed by the industry of the race management. Wrote Sylvia Tracey who sailed on Scratch, " We had an absolute ball being guests of GLYC. We were so very well looked after. Terrific organization from the whole team!"

They continued racing on Sunday fitting in two races before the club start for the regular Sunday divisional races at 2:00. It was certainly a long day for the sport boat competitors who had to wake up so early to watch the Rugby at 3:00 a.m. after a pizza night before that. But they fit it all in and were still smiling out on the water.
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GLYC sailors Stuart and Andrew were pretty stoked with winning five out of six races to win the ASBA Vic championship on Emma Peel with skip
GLYC sailors Stuart and Andrew were pretty
stoked with winning five out of six races
to win the ASBA Vic championship on Emma
Peel with skip


Kiss helmed by Greg Schwerinski from MYC led every race and crossed the finish line first. However, Emma Peel, skippered by James Dwyer from SRBSC, and brilliantly crewed by GLYC sailors, Stuart Loft and Andrew Somerville, usually finished second, but with the boat's handicap calculated in, won five out of the six races acing the championship.

Stoked skippered by Peter Rae from GLYC took third while Pornstar skippered by Chris Bland from RBYC carried home fourth in the series. Scratch from MYC with Stuart Schafer took fifth and Black Betty from BRYC skippered by Tim Smith carried home sixth place.

The sailors packed up their speed machines and relaxed in the club rooms watching a slide show of their on water efforts while race management ran the club's afternoon races.

Well done to Stuart and Andrew who crewed on Emma Peel helping to bring her into first place in the championship with five out of six wins. And well done, Stuart, for working so hard to make this sports boat dream come to fruition here at the GLYC.

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:24pm by Christie Arras

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Tackers

Fun out on the water in Tackers
Fun out on the water in Tackers

The Tackers program returned to the GLYC over the fall school holidays as well as an adult class and the development squad coaching of the experienced junior fleet. Fourteen children completed the Tackers program, two women completed the start sailing course and seven of our junior fleet completed development coaching.

The weather was, perfect allowing all 23 participants to out on the water each day.

This is the third season GLYC has offered a school holiday learn to sail program, and from the sailors' responses, the program continues to be a resounding success.

Spencer Zizman (9) who only started sailing the first day of Tackers, said that he had the best time ever. "I never knew sailing was this much fun," he said.

Dawn Jeffries, a local Paynesville lady, after completing the Adult Start Sailing course said: "I have had the most brilliant week, and now have some fab new friends."

The young sailors had a blast as they learned to sail, race, tip the Optis over and play tag with balls out on the water. All the games and capsizing are designed to take the fear out of sailing and to familiarize the children with balancing and tiller work and reading the wind and weather.

A versatile sailor, Kate Hyde rocks the boat in Tackers then races at the GLYC in the Sports Boats championship
A versatile sailor, Kate Hyde rocks the
boat in Tackers then races at the GLYC in
the Sports Boats championship


They also dressed up as pirates and had a great movie pirate night with popcorn and tacos.

Many thanks to Sharna and Lyn who worked so hard behind and not so behind the scenes and for those who offered to assist on or off the water.

The Tackers program will return in January and again over Easter.

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:08pm by Christie Arras

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Shiny Stainless Steel?

George shines up nicely for Opening Day festivities
George shines up nicely for Opening Day
festivities

Want your SS bright and shiny? Sick of rusty patches on your bright work, lifelines, swaged fittings, etc? You need Spotless Stainless!

The Australian distributor has stopped bringing it in because of the fall in the A$ so I am looking for potential buyers of a US quart bottle if I import a small quantity. Looks like a quart bottle will come out in the vicinity of A$65 per bottle. Not cheap, but this is enough to do all the brightwork on a 30'+ yacht and still have some left over.

If interested please contact me at russ.peel@gmail.com

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:29pm by Russ Peel

03 8626 8700

Tales of the Whale and the Bird

New Caledonia and onto Brisbane 27/10/15

The knees have it in the ASBA Vic championships on Kiss
The knees have it in the ASBA Vic
championships on Kiss

'Bonjour' family and friends,

As I write this we are on passage from Noumea to Brisbane!! I have so many mixed feelings. It's hard to comprehend how far we have travelled, so many miles, and all the amazing places we have visited. I wonder at all the many challenges we have faced sailing Whale And The Bird in such a variety of weather and sea conditions. I still have a nervous feeling bringing her into new ports and marinas; it's always a relief to be securely anchored or tied up after negotiating new waterways. I would much rather be sailing on the wide blue ocean and anchoring in sheltered bays with good holding rather than in busy ports and gusty. tightly packed marinas. I guess it is all part of cruising but the most rewarding aspect by far has been the people we have met.

The past month has gone past so quickly, and unfortunately, again it has been taken up with boat maintenance. I'm not surprised when I remember the constant many miles of work Whale And The Bird has done; ocean passages are hard on yachts. This time we had the rudder taken off(while in the marina berth) as there was movement on the rudder stock. Pete can detail this when we are at the loft one Friday night over a few beers. Pete has done an amazing job, firstly, fixing all manner of things on the boat, patiently working with people in non-English speaking countries and often walking miles in the never ending search for basic parts. While the boat is packed full of spare parts there is sometimes one thing that is not in our 'chandlery/bilge'. Recently we could not find the right globe for the deck light in the shops while in Noumea.

We left Vuda Point Marina, Fiji, for New Caledonia on 26th September motoring to leave through the Navula Pass. We were sorry to say goodbye to the staff at the Vuda Point Marina in Fiji; they were so friendly and we received goodbye hugs from the staff. It's a crazy set up for berths but it's cosy and the staff greet you with smiles and you hear laughter and singing all the time.

The passage to New Caledonia, Noumea, was lovely with blue skies, just the right amount of breeze, flat seas and an amazing full moon to sail under at night. We entered Havanah Pass at day break, allowing a big cargo ship to go first; we joked that a line attached to the stern of the ship would have us through in no time. (New Caledonia has a lovely malty beer called 'Havanah' which we enjoyed ice cold for happy hour in the bar at the Marina). The pass was relatively calm apart from a small patch of short waves standing up in the middle which we thought was a bit like sailing on the lakes at home. We then motored for 6 hours winding our way through narrow waterways with high mountains on either side leading into the biggest lagoon fringed by reef we have seen so far and on into the port of Noumea. Unfortunately, there has been extensive mining in places leaving raw patches of red earth exposed so when it rains the bays fill with red silt and become discoloured.

Life members Sandy, Bob and Elsie and Hal pose with Commodore Jacqui and past Commodore John on Opening Day
Life members Sandy, Bob and Elsie and Hal
pose with Commodore Jacqui and past
Commodore John on Opening Day


Noumea port and surrounding bays are crammed full of boats on moorings; there's no other way to describe it. Arriving boats have to compete with the locals for anchorage space while Port Moselle Marina has one dock for visitors, allowing 3 days for check in and re provisioning. This is flexible and we were fortunate to stay the 3 weeks on the dock while our repairs were done, but with no rudder we were going no where! We at first had to anchor in the bay outside the marina but then the gendarmes arrived by boat to tell us we were too close to the area for boat(huge cruise ships) traffic. So we pulled up the anchor and squeezed in amongst the moored boats on the other side of the harbour. The next day while in at the marina arranging a berth, the wind increased and our anchor dragged; we just managed to get back in time to avoid a collision with a boat on a mooring behind us.

Noumea is a mixture of Indigenous, French and Chinese people and, as in Tahiti and the Marquesas, the infrastructure and services appear to be heavily subsided by the French Government. Unfortunately it seems that the Indigenous people are marginalised and unemployment and substance abuse is evident for some of them. There was also a steady arrival of cruise ships and it was lovely to hear Aussie accents and chat to the passengers as they quickly explored Noumea. The ships usually only stayed overnight!! We explored Noumea in our usual way, walking and on public transport. There are some lovely beaches and a big town square/park to enjoy. I always gravitate to the markets in the countries we visit, buying fresh local produce; in Noumea it was right next to the marina. Pete and I enjoyed sitting on a stool at the coffee bar watching the interesting sights, practicing ordering 'cafe au lait' in french and using the free wifi. The supermarket had the most amazing selection of cheese, pate, meats and savoury produce. I made lunch most days: fresh baguettes with ham, tomato, cheese(blue vein for me), lettuce and homemade pawpaw chutney from Tonga. Yum. I could tell you about the cakes, better still, I have photos!!

G'Day a few quick written words, to end this newsletter. We are HOME. We are safely tied up in Brisbane! It is so wonderful to be in Australia, to see the lovely beaches, the special colours that are unique in our landscape and hear Aussie accents!! No more problems with people not understanding my accent. I will write more for the next newsletter about our passage from Noumea to Brisbane. We will be looking for the next weather window to start our trip down the Australian coast.

Cheers from two very tired but happy sailors.

Anne and Pete

Updated: 6 Nov 2015 12:27pm by Christie Arras


Gippsland Lakes Yacht Club
P.O. Box 194, Paynesville VIC 3880

Club phone03 5156 6864
Emailglyc@sailglyc.com
Websitewww.sailglyc.com

Flag Officers

CommodoreJacqui Loft0468 987 684
Vice CommodoreWendy Gardiner0498 116 752
Rear CommodoreJames Frecheville5156 7103 / 0412 979 824
SecretaryRuss Peel5156 6691 / 0408 589 805
TreasurerJenny Brown0403 819 635
Sailing CaptainJames Frecheville5156 7103 / 0412 979 824
Sailability OfficerAndrew Thistlethwaite5156 0141

Committee

Immediate Past CommodoreDavid Parish0437 516 666
Publicity and WandererChristie Arras5156 7861
Club HouseDave Bacon5156 7524
Discover Sailing CoordinatorSharna Baskett0409 207 331
Grounds & StorageJames Callahan5156 0655 / 0488 500 795
Club BoatsBrian Carroll0411 743 602
IT Tim Shepperd0400 666 486

Classifieds:
Wooden Canadian Canoe

Beautiful wooden Canadian canoe crafted by James Frecheville.
14 feet long with 2 paddles
$350 ono

Contact: David Davidson
Phone: 0415820147

Rudder for sale

Dovetailed- Laminated
5 feet /1.5 mtrs long. Beautiful condition
Originally made for racing a Cole 23
Would suit drop rudder conversion for another yacht due to its length.
$190

Contact: Ray Bouvet
Phone: 0427566417
Email: rayb227@hotmail.com

Pacer Dinghy

Everything in very good condition. View in Paynesville.
0427221161 cell

Contact: John Pearson
Phone: 51567013
Email: hilsnjohn@bigpond.com

Puffin Pacer for sale

wooden hull
3 sails, main, jib, spinnaker
ready to sail with some T.L.C.
12 months registered road trailer

$700

Contact: Daryl Brooks
Phone: 0411637572